Trestman gets scientific

Trestman gets scientific

Posted by Bob LeGere on Thu, 01/17/2013 - 23:52
I’ve heard of boxing referred to as “the sweet science,” and I’ve seen the classic film “Weird Science,” starring Anthony Michael Hall and especially Kelly LeBrock. I’m even old enough to remember listening to Thomas Dolby’s obnoxious new wave/synth-pop recording of “She Blinded Me With Science,” in 1982. But until Marc Trestman’s press conference on Thursday I had not heard of “the science of football.” And I was not alone. While discussing his potential assistants, Trestman said: “We've got to put together a staff of coaches of high character; men who are great teachers, men who are experts in the science of football, the science of our game, that are detailed and organized and are specialists and care about our players and are willing to do whatever it takes on a daily basis to help them master their craft, to continue on this level of winning consistently and playing for championships.” I asked around, but no one else seemed to know for sure what Trestman meant by “the science of football,” either. So, why not ask Phil Emery? He’s the guy who hired Trestman, so he should know. He did. “The practical part of it is, he is talking about the techniques and the skills required of the position,” Emery said. “Marc is not the first person I have heard refer to the skills and the techniques and the application of coaching as a science. “It is using what the athlete has, drilling or repping him in the skills of football.” OK, now I get it. But Emery went on. “And applying that from those skills to the bigger picture of, now we've gone from one individual to, you add the O-line, you add the wideouts, the team and how does that come together in terms of using those skills that you have developed with the individuals and their particular strengths and weaknesses and applying it to winning and moving the football or stopping a team.” OK, now I don’t get it as much. But I think I still understand it better than “She Blinded Me With Science.”
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